Strict Standards: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/New_York' for 'EST/-5.0/no DST' instead in /homepages/18/d163655616/htdocs/forum/viewtopic.php on line 943

Strict Standards: getdate(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/New_York' for 'EST/-5.0/no DST' instead in /homepages/18/d163655616/htdocs/forum/viewtopic.php on line 943
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3824: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /viewtopic.php:943)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3826: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /viewtopic.php:943)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3827: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /viewtopic.php:943)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3828: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /viewtopic.php:943)
SKY-MAP.ORG / WIKISKY • View topic - Astronomy Students Find 1,300 Asteroids

Astronomy Students Find 1,300 Asteroids

Astronomy Students Find 1,300 Asteroids

Postby admin » Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:08 pm

Five college students combing through telescope images have found more than 1,300 previously undetected asteroids.

The newly discovered asteroids now make up about one in 250 known objects in the solar system, but none are known to be a threat to Earth?yet. Some asteroids have orbits close to Earth's, so they pose a collision danger. NASA and other organizations have been involved for several years now in efforts to find the bigger space rocks that could destroy the planet or a lot of its life.

"There's no immediate danger, but anything that crosses Earth's orbit could, in a hundred, a thousand, a million years, crash into us if we reach the same point at the same time," said Andrew Becker, an assistant professor in astronomy at the University of Washington in Seattle who assisted the asteroid-hunting undergrads.

Becker said his students set out to find supernovae, or the remnants of exploding stars, but the asteroids blocked their view like a swarm of tiny flies.

"I kept asking the students what they had found and they kept saying, 'More asteroids. No supernovae, but lots of asteroids,'" Becker said.

University of Washington astronomy students Amy Rose, Amber Almy, Amanjot Singh, Kenza Sigrid Arraki and Kathryn Smith made the discoveries in 2005 and 2006. The 8.2-foot (2.5-meter) Sloan telescope at Apache Point, N.M., was used to collect the data that the students used, which they combed through with the help of computer software

The Minor Planet Center at Harvard University verified the astronomical finds and, if the students continue to collect data , each may get to name up to 260 asteroids.

"It's an amazing feeling - I feel like I'm jumping into research," said Rose, a junior at the University of Washington. "It's not just taking tests and going to class."

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy, NASA, Japanese Monbukagakusho, Max Planck Society of Germany and Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Original Story: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0 ... found.html
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 5:21 pm

Postby Stephen R. Hickman » Wed Oct 10, 2007 5:04 pm

I hope that these college students have large families and a lot of friends, because they have some naming to do! :wink::D
Stephen R. Hickman
Stephen R. Hickman
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:44 pm

Postby moonster » Wed Oct 10, 2007 8:44 pm

I hope that these college students have large families and a lot of friends, because they have some naming to do! :wink::D


True :D


Here's the UW news release with bit more details:
http://uwnews.org/article.asp?articleid=37120

I just wondering how come the 7-8 years old survey that already has been extensively processed and studied still gives such discoveries?

While back it was already processed specifically for moving objects identification:
http://www.astro.washington.edu/ivezic/ ... ssmoc.html

Did they missed those 1300 asteroids or they didn't care was it was moving out there?..

Just wondering...
moonster
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:59 am

Postby Stephen R. Hickman » Thu Oct 11, 2007 6:19 pm

The U.S. Government allocates less than $5,000,000, IIRC, per year to find potential Earth-killer asteroids. That is just enough to cover about 3% of the sky. The thing to remember is that it's a very big sky! So yes, discoveries are still coming in. Also, the 1,300 asteroids wern't missed; they were the ones that were found. There are undoubtedly far more out there just waiting to be found--and one of them just might have a date with Earth.
Stephen R. Hickman
Stephen R. Hickman
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:44 pm

Postby moonster » Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:41 pm

The U.S. Government allocates less than $5,000,000, IIRC, per year to find potential Earth-killer asteroids. That is just enough to cover about 3% of the sky.

Yes, I remember the fact was mentioned in "Deep Impact". I believe NASA is working on new project that dedicated for asteroids search. Deep Impact finally had, if not deep, but at least some impact on US government :)
moonster
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:59 am

Postby Stephen R. Hickman » Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:13 am

moonster, right fact, wrong movie. it was from "Armageddon".
Stephen R. Hickman
Stephen R. Hickman
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:44 pm

Postby moonster » Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:52 pm

moonster, right fact, wrong movie. it was from "Armageddon".

You right, I meant "Armageddon". I like that movie, though it's all wrong scientifically
moonster
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:59 am

Postby Stephen R. Hickman » Sat Oct 13, 2007 11:41 pm

True, but the FX's were cool.
Stephen R. Hickman
Stephen R. Hickman
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:44 pm


Return to Recent discoveries

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron