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SKY-MAP.ORG / WIKISKY • View topic - Space Station/Atlantis

Space Station/Atlantis

Space Station/Atlantis

Postby Parsec » Wed Jun 20, 2007 10:19 am

Caught the pass of the Space station and Atlantic last night.
Absolutely fantastic!

Atlantis had separate from the station and was trailing it by approximately 10?. As they passed over at zenith they were at least visual magnitude 2.0+.

I have seen a shuttle and space station in the sky before at the same time, and it remains fantastic every time, the beauty of it never fades.

I urge anyone that has a chance to view it to take the opportunity.

You can check pass times and location at;

http://www.heavens-above.com/
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Postby Jonnyb13 » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:34 pm

You used a telescope or just your eyes?

If you used a telescope, what could you see?
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Postby Parsec » Wed Jun 20, 2007 7:41 pm

Just a visual, no telescope.

You do not need a telescope to see them. They have a good visual magnitude.
It is just nice on the rare occasion to see them both in the sky at the same time.

I have seen some telescope pictures of the ISS and they showed a surprising amount of detail.

I think I may try a telescope capture myself of the Space Station on a future pass, when we gets clear skies again.

This has been a really bad spring for observing. Many cloudy nights and things don't seem to be improving much.
In fact we will have a pass in about an hour, but it is overcast and very little chance of clearing.
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Postby Jonnyb13 » Thu Jun 21, 2007 3:53 pm

Can you get me a link to a site showing the positions of the space station and any other sattelites over england please.

and very often I usually see very faint star light lights moving about plane speed accross the night sky you have to have very good eyesight so that you dont loose it and when you take your eye off them you never really find them again.

Have you seen the space station image of the sun?
It shows the space station and some sort of shuttle a few hundred metres from each other right infront of the sun.
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Postby Parsec » Thu Jun 21, 2007 6:15 pm

Here are two good sites for satellite observing.

http://science.nasa.gov/RealTime/JPass/20/

http://www.heavens-above.com/

Just put in your location and select the particular satellite and they will give you the visual pass times and directions.

For the Space Station, shuttles and Iridium satellites I tend to use the hevens-above.

I usually see very faint star light lights moving about plane speed accross the night sky


This is how satellites appear.
A lot of them you will find on Polar orbits, travelling a North South direction.

If you see ISS or shuttle they act the same as the 'regular' satellites, however they are much brighter.

I don't know where in England you are so I checked for any space station passes over London.
You guys are not in the visible pass window right now. You may have to wait a couple of weeks.

I have seen a couple of pictures of the station silhouetted aginst the Sun and moon. They are quite nice.

Someone had taken several animated pictures of the shuttle docked at the space station through a telescope and posted them on the space weather site.
The photos showed a lot of detail.

http://spaceweather.com/

Ron W.
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