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SKY-MAP.ORG / WIKISKY • View topic - Constellation and planet help!

Constellation and planet help!

Postby Hugeknot » Sun Apr 08, 2007 12:42 pm

Hi
The Fuji S9600 is a digicam that is trying to be a DSLR - I would love a canon 400d!!
iso - 200-400
Exposure @ 400iso = 20-50 seconds
Exposure @ 200iso = 40-100 seconds
These exposure times are just a guide and you should experiment really. If the aurora is really bright, you can drop to a 15 sec exposure with a 400iso.

Fuji provia 400 is perfect because it has high grain and no reciprocity failure up to 4 min. My best Aurora pics were taken with this film. Also, I like to limit exposure time to 30sec because this is the point when star trails apear. If you have a full moon behind you, a medium aurora and snowy landscape, you can get a perfect picture with a 400 because you will capture the landscape as well.
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Postby Tuguldur » Sun Apr 08, 2007 9:46 pm

Tony,

many thanks for the info! :D

I just wanted to imagine by your "data"s how the aurora is visible. 15-30sec bi ISO400 seems great! :D

In fact, I have NikonF65, film SLR. I've some very nice astrophotos taken by ISO400, film through the telescope. Hope I'll get one scanner someday, and if then I'll post them here.

Tuugii :)
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Postby Parsec » Mon Apr 09, 2007 11:54 am

Tuugii,

I also hope you get a scanner someday. I would really like to see your photos.

I am trying to get my telescope set up now to take some astrophotos.
I'll have to get a equatorial mount with drive motors so I can track.
They are quite expensive so I am checking out a couple of good used ones.

I can get good lunar pictures because there is lots of light, but I would like to try some deep sky objects.

Ron :)
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Postby Hugeknot » Mon Apr 09, 2007 2:52 pm

There are some good articles on this site!
http://www.ephotozine.com/techniques/vi ... ?recid=153

Happy reading
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Postby Parsec » Mon Apr 09, 2007 8:32 pm

Thanks for the site Tony. I'll be giving it a good look at.
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Postby Tuguldur » Mon Apr 09, 2007 9:30 pm

Ron,

yes, the automatic EQ mounts(go-to) are very expensive...I have one old Russian manual EQ mount. I just use additional guide scope with very narrow field of view, and the tracking goes without any problems. The main concern is that the polar alignment must be very good.

Also check the barn door mount. I don't have one, but its really easy to build one for your slr camera. Since there are so many DSOs for a little slrs.

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Postby Parsec » Tue Apr 10, 2007 11:00 am

Your Russian mount probably serves you well. From what I have seen and heard Russian astro equipment is quite good quality.

The mount I get will have to be at least an EQ5. I have a 10" Newtonian on a Dob mount that I am going to try to put on an EQ5 or 6.
The scope is an f5 so it grabs a fair amount of light. I don't know how well these scopes work for astrophotography. But I would like to give it a try.

We (RASC) have an observatory here in a relatively dark place. It has a 17.5 " Newtonian on a Dob mount. It's great for observation but I don?t think all that good for photography.

I have a home built 'barn door' mount on an old surveyors tripod. I am going to try it out over the summer. Not much to look at but I might work.

Ron
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Postby Tuguldur » Tue Apr 10, 2007 11:24 am

Ron,

yes, the quality of those Russian astro-equipments are just great! I really enjoy it very much :P

You have a great scope! And I guess 10" f/5 newt. is a big scope, though, so you'll need EQ6...I hope you can get a good second hand one, by a bearable price :D

By the way, the quality of the astrophoto not only depends on the scope. It depends on many factors such as your instrument, ability of photography...
Even with 2" scope, if you're enough skilled and if you use quality CCD, then you can have awesome images. The main problem for the Dob. mount are of course they aren't suited for tracking. But you can shot some nice photos with the regular digital camera, just by holding it right to the eyepiece :D
Thus, if you get some little "skill" needed for astro-photo then you could have astonishing shots with 17", which are far better than 10" scope shots.
:)

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Postby Parsec » Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:30 pm

Even with 2" scope, if you're enough skilled and if you use quality CCD, then you can have awesome images.




Yes, I have seen some of the pictures the guys here have taken with 4 and 5 inch scopes. Absolutely awesome.

I have been around the net looking at some of the CCD imagers
Meade has one with the software. It allows multiple shots then stacking.
It is a little bit pricy but has a lot of features.
I see Celestron also has one but it does not have the same specifications as the Meade.

Just off topic for a moment.
Comet Lovejoy should be visible now low in the Eastern sky. I don?t know if you have seen it. It should be just to the left of Hercules between to 24 and 30 th of this month.
It should be visible here at around 4:00am local time.
But the weather here had been cloudy the last couple of nights. Might get some observing time Sunday. However, another storm for Monday into Tuesday.
Living here is not the best if you are interested in astronomy....
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Postby Tuguldur » Sat Apr 14, 2007 9:52 am

There are many great devices like Meade DSI, Orion Starshoot...and they aren't cheap... :(

But you can get an "approximate" results with just a regular Webcam under 30$ and with a free image stacking programs on the net.

Thanks for informing, I'm planning to observe Lovejoy, hope I'll shoot some images.

Also there is gonna be a Lyrid meteor shower in 20th Apr. I remember 20 or so per hour...

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Postby Parsec » Sat Apr 14, 2007 2:04 pm

But you can shot some nice photos with the regular digital camera, just by holding it right to the eyepiece


Tuugii,

I Tried this the other night just shooting through the eye piece. I have used film at one time and a SLR camera with a 'T' ring. But this is the first time I have tried through the eyepiece with a digital camera.
I use my Kodak DX7630. It did not turn out too bad for a non SLR camera.

The orignal picture I have here is much larger and clearer.

Image
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Postby Tuguldur » Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:39 am

Hi Parsec,

your shot is very nice indeed, I really like it! Did you made any changes on the photo? (by photoshop or corel..) if it isn't then your Kodak camera should be a superb one, though! :D

This is my shot, 2006-11-20:
Image
6" f/5, nikon coolpix3200, ISO 200, 1/200sec exposure time(hand held).

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Postby Parsec » Sun Apr 15, 2007 12:00 pm

Tuugii,

I looked at the Nikon coolpix 3200.
It looks a lot like the Kodak I use.

I just thought I would try through the eyepiece as you suggested.

I used the 10" newtonian. But I kept the power low. The eyepiece was a
32mm. Calculate that out with a 10" mirror at f5 is only 39X power.

The manual settings on the camera were 1/30 sec at f2.8 and ISO 100.
I didn't use photoshop or anything like that. I just down sized it from the orginal size 2856 x 2142 pixels.

Just of topic for a moment. Thanks for the Lyrid meteor shower reminder. I forgot all about it.

I took a quick look for April in my Observer's Handbook and I see on the 19th the Moon is only 0.9?N of Pleiades. A good oppertunity for Hugeknot to get some nice pictures. On the 25th Saturn is 1.1?S of the Moon.



Ron
:)
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Postby Tuguldur » Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:17 pm

Ron,

thanks for the info :D .

You Kodak should be very nice one indeed, I really like that shot above. :P With a very little chromatic abberation it looks so nice! :D

Also the moon is only 3degree 42' from the Venus in 20th April!

Hope we'll capture some shots, and share them :)

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Postby Parsec » Wed Apr 18, 2007 10:52 am

Hope we'll capture some shots, and share them


Tugii,

I have it marked now, thanks. I don't have a really good view of the western sky here. But if conditions look good I will go to a different location.

In fact I am wondering if it would be possible to get the Moon, Venus and comet 2P/Encke in the same frame.

Encke is in the western sky now just to the right of Aries, just under Venus to the right.

International Astronomy Day is this Saturday. We usually set up some scopes in two locations here next to libararies to promote astronomy and especially for the kids and perhaps get some interested.

So, I may get a chance to get some astrophotos then.

If you get any good captures, please post them. :D
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