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SKY-MAP.ORG / WIKISKY • View topic - Direction of solar system
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Direction of solar system

PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 4:08 pm
by volantis
Does anybody know of a peer reviewed paper, which measures (not calculates) the Sun's direction through the galaxy?

Dave

PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:15 am
by rayajko
All I can tell you is the sun is taking the planets and all other solar system bodies in the general direction of the Lyra-Hercules area at 12 m/s.

Bob

PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:53 am
by volantis
rayajko wrote:All I can tell you is the sun is taking the planets and all other solar system bodies in the general direction of the Lyra-Hercules area at 12 m/s.


Hi Bob,

Are you sure that isn't 12 km/s? How could anybody measure 12 m/s on such a large scale?

As for your guess, I know there are many assumptions as to which direction the Sun is heading, but I am only interested in a bona fide, peer reviewed treatment of the topic. If astronomers can measure the velocity of the Sun with regard to the center of the Milky Way, they can certainly measure its direction. I'm looking for a *measured* direction, not a calculated direction.

Thanks anyway.

PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 2:51 pm
by Jonnyb13
Can scientists locate the centre of the universe by looking at which direction the galaxies are going in then draw a line to a centre point?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:02 pm
by Parsec
I sort of know where you are coming from.
I think the problem we run into here is that galaxies do not fly off in a straight line. They are influenced by gravitational attraction of other galaxies, dark matter and basically anything with mass.
So, a straight line back to a 'beginning' really can not be calculated.

The other point, there is no center of the universe per say.
The center in essence would be where ever you are. You live on the earth, so for all intents and purposes the center of the universe is earth.
If you lived on a planet somewhere in the Andromeda Galaxy, the center of the universe would then be that planet.

Try to think of it like this,

Think of a large perfectly smooth shinny metal sphere and you live on the surface. Now try to think in the mode without directionally thinking up or down.
Some day I come by and ask you, "Jonnyb13 I want you to take a measuring stick and measure the distance to the center". It would become apparent very quickly you can't do it, because there is really no center to the surface of sphere.
The only hypothetical center is where you are at, on any given moment.

Now the tricky part is to keep the same train of thought but forget spheres, shapes or directions.
Then you sort of get an idea of the universe.

To ask where the center of the universe is, something like asking what is located 10 miles north of the North pole.

Re: Direction of solar system

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:17 pm
by Parsec
Does anybody know of a peer reviewed paper, which measures (not calculates) the Sun's direction through the galaxy?

Dave


You might try a search on D. R. Gies or J. W. Helsel.
This might give you what you are looking for. I think there was a paper on correlation of Ice ages and the Suns direction through the Galaxy or something like this
The Ice age stuff may be no interest to you but the 'directional' stuff might.

measures and calculations

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 1:34 am
by ogarza
Unless the distance and time table is short, I think that to measure the direction of the sun in it's galactic orbit from any given point is an unrealistic venture. Gravity is a complex and unpredictable variable in the galactic orbit of any given star.

measure of motion through galaxy

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 12:35 am
by ogarza

Re: measure of motion through galaxy

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 3:56 pm
by volantis
ogarza wrote:I hope this helps;

http://www.britannica.com/ebc/article-68100

I appreciate your effort, but the article is too ambiguous and it does not give reference to the peer reviewed articles that determined the Sun's direction. I'm looking for a very clear and empirically derived direction for the Sun.

You'd think there would be numerous published articles on this topic. Even if there was an article that explained why the direction couldn't be accurately determined, that would be helpful to me.

Dave